Sesquicentennial

of Dover Meeting

1824-1974

History of the Meeting

and

Exerpts from Early Minutes

[This document was scanned and retyped in some parts to put on our website from a mimeographed document put together for the 1974 175th Anniversary of the meeting.]

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

HISTORY

OPENING MINUTES OF 1824

EXCERPTS FROM MINUTES

BOOKS FOR RECORDS 

FIRST MARRIAGE 

A MATTER OF MONEY 

MEETINGHOUSE FOR CENTER QUARTERLY MEETING 

NON-MILITARY COMPLIANCE

SCRIPTURE READING AND BIBLES 

SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS 

RELIEF FOR INDIANS AND AFRICANS

EDUCATION

DISOWNING MEMBERS

STATISTICS OF FIRST 80 YEARS

WILMINGTON MEETING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORY OF DOVER MEETING

In the later part of the 1700's and the early part of the 18OO's, there was a marked migration of Friends to South­western Ohio. They came principally from North and South Carolina, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. They were attracted to this part of the country for various reasons. Some by the reports of the beautiful and fertile valleys of the Miami Rivers, some by the desire to rear their families in a state where slavery did not exist, and others perhaps from the sheer love of adventure. For the most part they were responsible citizens who were able to buy more or less land, and they settled around Waynesville, Ohio. This led to the establishment of Miami Quarterly Meeting which was a child of Redstone Quarterly Meeting of Pennsylvania and which was subordinate to Baltimore Yearly Meeting.

A letter written by Samuel Linton to his friend Abel Satterthwaite of Philadelphia and dated ye 10th of 5th month 1806 at Todd’s Settlement, Warren County, Ohio stated that the immigration to these parts was prodigious; that it was supposed that not less than 1,000 new members were incorporated in the Miami Monthly Meeting in the year 1805, and that the members of said monthly meeting were more numerous than any other in the United States.

From Todd's Settlement near which is now Waynesville, Ohio some Friends migrated to what was known as the Center neighborhood. Here the first Grist Mill and the first Meeting House in Clinton County were built. Here Center Meeting was first a preparative and later a Monthly Meeting, and was the first house of worship in Clinton County.

As early as 1800, Mahlon Haworth, son of George Haworth of Tennessee vistited Ohio on a prospecting tour. Four years later in company with John and James Wright and their families, he settled on Todd's Fork in what is now the Dover neighborhood. About the same time Daniel Dillon settled in this locality. These families formed the nucleus of the Society of Friends at Dover.

About the year 1808, the settlers made request of Center Monthly Meeting for an indulged meeting, which was granted. This meeting was held for sometime at the home of Ezekiel Frazier and from this circumstance was called “Frazier Meeting.” After this is was held for a while in a vacant house in the neighborhood. The people now concluded to purchase a lot for a church and burial purposes, and bought one and one-half acres from Amos Hodson for the sum of $2.25 upon which the present Dover Meeting House and burial ground are situated. The first building erected was of round logs, with a clapboard roof. For want of lumber with which to lay a floor, they covered the ground with chips of wood, and the congregation seated themselves on the sleepers.

After some time they procured lumber and made a floor and seats. Their heating apparatus consisted of a stove hearth in the floor with a stone pillar three or four feet high on each corner of it. Upon these pillars a stick and clay chimney was constructed which carried the smoke asway from the fire on the hearth.

About five years later, 1813, Preparatory Meeting status was granted and it was christened “Dover Meeting”by Jessie Dillon. It was named for a parent Dover Meeting in Guilford County, North Carolina. A few years later it became necessary to establish a Monthly Meeting which was done 4th day of 9th month, 1824. At this time it was made to include Seneca Pre­parative, now Jamestown Meeting. After six years, or in 1830, Grassy Run Preparative Meeting was established and this together with Dover and Seneca Meetings constituted Dover Monthly Meeting. This relationship continued until 1910, when each meeting was granted the privilege of becoming its own Monthly Meeting.

In 1844-1845 the log building was replaced by the present brick building a few rods northeast of the log building. Like all meeting houses of its day, equality of sex was emphasized by allowing for separate meetings of men and women. This was done by a partition so arranged that each should have its own half of the house. This partition was in the form of shutters which could be raised or lowered as the occasion demanded, being left open during the hour of worship and closed for the separate business sessions.

During the early years of its history, in keeping with the spirit of the times, Dover Monthly Meeting shared with others of the same faith in exercising a strict discipline over its members. Marrying outside of the meeting, non attendance at worship, de­parting from plainness of dress and address were considered grave offenses and were sufficient grounds for complaint to the Prepara­tive Meeting. This complaint was in turn taken up by the Monthly Meeting, and if acknowledgment of error was not made by the offender, his name (or hers) was dropped from the roll and he ceased to be a member of the Society. Holding steadfastly to the "priesthood of all believers", the ministry of Dover Meet­ing during the 1800's was a voluntary one, most of its ministers coming from among its own members. These preachers of righteous did not assume the office of pastor, nor did they receive any financial support from the church. That they have been in all points worthy is evidenced by the fact that some of the brightest lights in Quakerdom have at sometime been connected with this Monthly Meeting.

When the pioneer came to this section of Ohio, he was faced by many perils, Not the least of these was the presence of the Red Man, Holding fast to the principles of peace and the love of humanity, Friends treated the Indians kindly and were treated kindly in return. On the side of Todd's Fork opposite the Haworth cabin, the Indians had a camping ground which they oc­cupied during the hunting season. The lights from their camp fires could be plainly seen and the Indians were their frequent visitors. Among these visitors was the well known Chief Logan. It was the custom of the Red Men to signify their good will by stacking their arms outside the house. Many stories were told of the friendly encounters between the Indians and Friends in this area. At that period Friends were not in sympathy with the course the government was pursuing in dealing with the Indian problem, and in the minutes of the 11th month,1831, we find David Bailey, an elder of Dover Monthly Meeting, asking for a minute to go in company with a party of Friends to Washington D.C. accompanied by certain Indian chiefs to present to the Congress a memorial in their behalf.

At a later date, the issue of slavery stirred this community to its foundations and Underground Railway Stations were established in several Quaker homes. Here the unfortunate runaway slaves were kindly treated and in the shadows of the night were spirited away on their road to freedom.

At the close of the Civil War, the interest which had centered in the slavery question was transferred to the work of temperance, and Dover Meeting was noted for its great outdoor temperance meetings held in the grove adjoining the church. The most famous temperance orators of the day were secured for these occasions, which continued for 50 years until this work was taken over by the Wilmington Yearly Meeting when it was organized in 1890. Since that time, Dover Meeting has maintained a W.C.T.U. and much emphasis has been laid upon this. feature of the Society's work.

The matter of the education of their children held a large place in the minds of early Friends, and from the earliest times Dover Settlement has had its nearby schoolhouse. Monthly Meeting schools were maintained for 20 years at Dover and Grassy Run. Among tha instructors of these schools were the well-known preachers, John Henry and Robert Douglas, and George and Cyrus Carter. The educational standards were high, embracing the moral and spiritual as well as the mental welfare of the pupils. The "queries" were often a part of their curriculum.

John Henry Douglas later became the leading spirit in the evangelistic movement which swept over the church in general about 100 years ago and he was known throughout the length and breadth of the country. He was recorded as a minister .from Dover Monthly Meeting in 1858. He was Dover's great contribution to this movement which inaugurated a new era among Friends. In the larger vision which it afforded, less attention was given to the vigorous discipline which the meeting had formerly maintained, and it began to throw loving arms around the unsaved. It also became interested in the missionary movement both at home and abroad, and from that time on benevolences of various kinds have formed a -urge part of the church's activities.

In 1924 a centennial celebration was enjoyed. The chairman of that event was John Spear and the secretary was Charles Dwiggins. A statement written at that time was as follows: A century has wrought many changes but none more marked than in the customs and discipline of Friends. No higher tribute can be paid to members of Dover Monthly Meeting than to say that each generation has been true to the faith and served well in its own time. The distinctive garb, the plain language, the one time silent meetings have mostly passed away, but the spirit and high ideals still endure.

Whatever achievements may have been reached by this meeting prior to 1924, much of its success may be attributed -to the spiritual leadership of ths ministers and pastors who gave of their time and talents to the preaching of the gospel and today they are held in blessed and sacred memory. The first resident minister of Dover Monthly Meeting was John Pearson. Others were Wilson, George, and Cyrus Carter, John Pigeon, Lewis Hunt, Isarah Peello, William Gallimore, Micajah Moorman, Frank Moorman, Josephus Hoskins, John K. Howell, and Irena Hunnicutt.

The list of pastors of Dover Meeting included Josephus Hoskins, Benjamin Hawkins, Leroy Clemmens, Emma Townsend, Albert J. Brown., Samuel Haworth, I. Lindley Jones, Waldo Woody, Ida Allen, Esther Cook, Frank Moorman, and J.L. McWilliams.

During the last 50 years, the Dover Community has undergone a great change as has been true of ail of rural America. Farms are larger and many of the old Quaker homesteads have been demolished and much cf the land is no longer owned by the members of the meeting. Quaker youth were for the most part well educated -And there has been a great exodus from the land to find employment in the cities, Improved transportation has made it easier to travel farther to meeting or to use Sunday as a vacation day at a more distant place.

Dover Meeting has become smaller in numbers, but it has maintained a meeting for worship and Sunday School without interruption. It has also done its fair share in support and in the activities of the Quarterly and Yearly Meetings, Friends United Meeting, and the United Society of Friends Women. We have again been fortunate in pastoral leadership, either in cooperation with another Friends meeting or in obtaining a minister for Sunday services who also did some pastoral work on a part-time basis. Some students from Wilmington College and Bonebrake seminary have also served us. These pastors have been: Douglas Parker, Loren Hadley, Harry Leasure, Arthur Hammond, Hugh Wright, Walter Berry, William Delaney, Raymond Chapman, Harold Tollefson, Arthur Alexander, Wilbur Kamp, and Glenn Reece. Some of the College students who have also served us are Luther Warren, Wilton Thomas, Monroe Church, Bruce Hickman. To all of these, we are grateful for their services among us, and we deeply appreciate their work.

In the lata 1920's the Ladies Aid, as it was called at that time, purchased at auction the Dover Schoolhouse when the public one-room schools were closed. This building has since been used as a Community House for members of the Meeting and has been rented for family reunions or gatherings on many occasions.

In 1944 a Centennial Celebration was held commemorating the dedication of the present brick Meetinghouse. Fred Spear was chairman of this celebration and Percy Green was Monthly Meeting Clerk.

 

In 1954 a cement block addition was added to the church building. A water system, the gift of one member, provided restrooms in addition to the new Sunday School classroom. The men of the church provided the labor and the Women's Society provided the money for materials for the addition. A dedication service for the new addition was held Octcber 24, 1954. Wilton Thomas was pastor at this time and Dr Samuel Marble of Wilmington College gave tho dedicatory address in the afternoon.

In 1970 extensive remodeling of the church building was undertaken. The floor was improved, new paneling was added to the sidewalls, the ceiling was lowered, and a new lighting and heating system were installed. Again the men furnished the labor and the women purchased the materials. A rededication service was observed. Glenn Reece, our present pastor, was serving at the time.

As we look to the future, it is our earnest prayer that we may meet the challenges of our ever-changing world in a manner that will be pleasing to God as we strive to do His work.

 

 

The following are excerpts from the Monthly Meeting Minutes — Mostly during the first years.

A BOOK OF RECORD OF THE MINUTES OF DOVER MONTHLY MEETING OF FRIENDS HELD IN CLINTON COUNTY, STATE OF OHIO A.D. 1824

 

Centre Monthly Meeting informs that Dover and Seneca Preparatives request the priviledge of holding a monthly meeting; to be held at Dover the first 7th day in each month, and known by the name of Dover Monthly Meeting; Isaac Hawkins, Levi Cook, Ashur Brown, Seth Wilson, Daniel Freestone and Benjamin Rind are appointed to visit them in conjunction with women friends, judge of the propriety of granting their request and report to next meeting

Taken from the minutes of Miami Quarterly Meeting

the 8th of the 5th month 1824

---

The Committee appointed to visit Dover and Seneca Preparative meetings on their request for a monthly meeting, report they were willing that their request should be granted, which is united with. Daniel Freestone, John Newlin, Amos Kenworthy and Samuel Owen are appointed to attend the opening thereof at the time

proposed in next month and report to next meeting.

 

Taken from the minutes of Miami Quarterly meeting held the 14th day of the 3th month 1824.

Caleb Harvey

Assistant Clerk

---

Persuant to the foregoing minute, the Quarterly Meeting committee being some of them present, Dover Monthly Meeting was opened and held the 4th day of the 9th month 1824.

 

BOOKS FOR RECORDS

Dover Monthly Meeting 11th month, 1824

Jonah and Jonah and John Frazier are appointed to provide blank books for records of Marriage Certificates, and certificates of Removal, and Births and Deaths of this meeting and report the cost to the next meeting.

 

Dover Monthly Meeting of 12th Month, 1824

Friends appointed to procure books for records, report they have not procured any, they are continued. Daniel Bailey, Thomas P. Moorman, and John Peel are appointed to open free subscriptions to raise money to purchase books for records.

Dover Monthly Meeting 2nd month, 1825

The friends appointed produced books for records and inform they cost $1.75.

 

FIRST MARRIAGE

DOVER MONTHLY MEETING 11th month, 1824

Zacheriah M. Bangham and Elizabeth Johnson laid their intention of marriage in writing before this meeting. William Shields and Charles Atkinson are appointed to inquire into the young ban's cleanness with respect to marriage engagements with others., 3nd report to next meeting.

DOVER MONTHLY MEETING 12th month, 1824

The friends appointed to report, they found nothing to hinder Zechariah M. Bangham's proceeding in marriage with Elizabeth Johnson, and having consent of parents, they appeared and declared they continued their intentions of marriage with each other. They are therefore left at liberty to accomplish the same according to our order, William Shields and Jonah Frasier are appointed to attend the marriage, see that good order is observed, report to the next meeting, and produce the marriage certificate to be recorded.

DOVER MONTHLY MEETING lat month, 1325

One of the friends appointed report they attended the marriage of Zachariah M. Bangham and saw nothing but what was orderly and produced the certificate.

 

 

A MATTER OF MONEY

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month, 1825

The Treasurer produced an account of $4.15 ½ cent raised for building the Yearly Meeting House (Indiana Yearly Meeting) . He is directed to pay it to the Treasurer of the Quarterly Meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 4th month, 1828

By the minutes of our last Yearly Meeting, it appears that the subordinate meetings are directed to raise their quotas of the following sums: $150 to augment the Yearly Meeting stock, and $250 for the completion of the Yearly Meeting House. Our Preparative Meetings are directed to raise their respective quotas and pay them into the hands of the Treasurer of this meeting. The clerk is directed to furnish the Preparative Meetings with a copy of this minute.

Dover Monthly Meeting 11th month, 1830

The committee appointed to settle with the treasurer made the following report: We the committee appointed to settle with the treasurer agree to report that we have settled with the Treasurer and find a balance of $1.43 3/4cent in his hands. And we propose John Peebles for Treasurer for the ensuing year, which we submit to the meeting.

Signed on behalf of the committee by Thomas P. Moorman. The above report being read, the meeting expressed satisfaction therewith, and appointed John Peebles treasurer for the ensuing year.

Dover Monthly Meeting 11th month, 1833

By a minute received from the Quarterly Meeting, this meeting is directed to raise its proportion of the sum of $150 as a stock; which claiming the attention of this meeting it directs the Preparative Meetings to raise money in the usual apportionment as soon as practicable and place it in the hands of our Treasurer. The clerk is directed to furnish the Preparative Meeting with an extract of the above minute.

Dover Monthly Meeting 3rd month, 1834

The committee appointed on the apportionment made the following report: We the committee appointed to proportion the Preparative Meetings in raising money for the use of our society agree to propose that Dover pay 79$ and Seneca 21$ to the dollar.

Signed on behalf of the committed by Malon Haworth

 

MEETINGHOUSE FOR CENTER QUARTERLY MEETING
(Center Quarterly Meeting at this time cosisted of Center, Springfield, and. Dover Monthly Meetings)

Dover Monthly Meeting 1st month, 1826

John Pierson, Gayer Starbuck, Daniell Bailey, William Shields, John Oren, and Charles T. Moorman are appointed to unite with a like committee from Springfield and Center Monthly Meetings in proposing a plan for the accommodation of our contemplated Quarterly Meeting and report to next meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 2nd month, 1826

The united committee of Center, Springfield, and Dover Monthly Meetings appointed to propose a plan for the accommodation of our contamplated Quarterly Meeting report they have attended thereto, and propose putting up a cheap building for the present which is agreeable to this meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 4th month, 1828

The following minute was received from the Quarterly Meeting: The managers of the building of the Quarterly Meeting House reported as follows: Pursuant to appointment, we as managers of the building for the Center Quarterly Meeting House have proceeded and put the work under contract in the following manner:

A kiln of brick to contain 130,000 at $1.85 per thousand ($240.50) to be made and finished by the middle of the month next.

Procuring stone and doing the whole of the mason work except plastering at $248.50 which is to be finished by the middle of the 10th month next.

Procuring materials and doing the whole of the carpentry work so as to inclose and cover the building and laying the under floor except the part on which the gallery is to stand at $520.00 and to be completed by the middle of the 11th month next.
Total cost to be $1003

We as managers have bound ourselves for the payment of said money at the completion of the respective jobs. And we request that $150 be raised as soon as may be, to enable the carpenter to procure material this spring. All of which we submit to the meeting.

Joseph Doan, Jr. on behalf of the committee with which this meeting expressed a general satisfaction and continued the managers.

The committee apportioned the Monthly Meeting as follows:

 

Number of Males
(heads of families)

Raise cents to
the dollar

Total

Center Monthly Meeting

100

48 cents

$484.32

Springfield “ “

71

34 ¼ cents

$345.58

Dover “ “

37

17 ¾ cents

$179.10

Total

208 males

100 cents

$1009.00

 

Dover Monthly Meeting 6th month, 1828

The friends appointed to raise money for the building of Center Quarterly Meeting House reported than Dover and Seneca Meetings have raised their quotas.

Dover Monthly Meeting 12th month, 1929

The following minute was received from our last Quarterly Meeting to wit: The managers of the building of Center Quarterly Meeting House report they have purchased stoves for the use thereof. The cost of stoves is $58.70 with carriage $3.50; staples supporting the pipes 37 1/2cents. They have also expended $18.00 in altering the gallery seats and putting in garret windows; also have been subjected to the payment of $18.93 3/4cents in consequence of a suit being brought against them by William McMillan for the scaffold poles —total $99.57 1/4cents. They have received $30.00 for the old Meeting House which leaves $69.57 1/4cents. which they lay before the Quarterly Meeting, which is directed down to the Monthly Meetings and they directed to raise their respective quotas as soon as practicable

NON-MILITARY COMPLIANCE

Dover Monthly Meeting 11th month, 1828

The following communication was received from our last Quarterly Meetings: "To the Quarterly and"Monthly Meetings constituting Indiana Yearly Meeting—It is the earnest desire of this meeting that Friends whose lot it may be to suffer for our testimony against the spirit of war, may be meek and a quiet deportment, evince to the world, and particularly to those who may be charged with the execution of the laws by which we suffer, that a refusal to comply with the requisition thereof is a conviction that the practice of war is incompatible with the peaceable spirit of the Gospel. For our younger brethren an earnest solicitude has been felt, that they may bear a faithful testimony against the principles and practice of war. For though many of us who are farther advanced in life are exempt from such trials, yet in time past having partaken thereof, we feel a tender sympathy with those who have such difficulties to encounter. We are likewise engaged to caution our members against signing in conjunction with others, petitions for relief, or applying to the law for redress without first applying to the Meeting of Sufferings for advice.

Taken from the minutes of the Meeting for Sufferings held at Whitewater 10th month, 1327.

William Talbot, Clerk

This was approved by the Monthly Meeting and the forms for reporting accounts of sufferings for non-compliance with military requisitions was included.

DAILY READING OF THE SCRIPTURE and BIBLES IN EACH HOME

Dover Monthly Meeting 3rd month, 1830

David Bailey, Nathaniel Carter, Isaac Carpenter, James Bryan, Daniel Bailey and Mahlan Haworth are appointed with a like committee of women friends to extend labor for the removal of deficiencies in regard to plainness of dress and address directed by our last Yearly Meeting in the Epistle of Advice and report to the meeting 8th month next.

The subject of daily reading a portion of the scriptures in our families as directed by the Yearly Meeting in the year 1828 being revived in this meeting was concurred with and the subject referred to the above named committee.

The subject of ascertaining whether each family is supplied with a copy of the Old and New Testaments as directed by our last Yearly Me «ting is referred to the committee appointed on the subject of plainness who are to report on the subject to this meeting on the 8th month next.

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month, 1830

The joint committee of men and women friends appointed in the 3rd month last to extend labor for removal of deficiencies in regard to plainness of dress and address made a report as follows: We have attended to the appointment and labored as way opened to a degree of satisfaction, but we believe more labor in that respect will be necessary, which report was united with by the meeting and the clerk directed to forward an extract of the above minute to the Quarterly Meeting.

The committee to whom was referred the subject of the daily reading of a portion of the Holy Scripture^ in our famlies as recommended by our Yearly Meeting in the year 1828, report they have attended to the subject and extended labor therein and feel encouraged in believing that most families unite in the concern, and that a considerable number have reduced it to practice. The clerk is directed to forward an extract to the Quarterly Meeting.

The committee to whom was referred the subject of ascertaining whether each family is supplied with a copy of the Old and New Testaments, report they have attended to the subject and find all supplied except four who are without a copy of the Old Testament. They are continued to have the subject under their care until all shall be supplied, and to furnish those with copies they consider not able to procure for themselves and report to the next meeting. The clerk is directed to forward an extract of the above minute to the Quarterly Meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 7th month., 1834

The committee appointed to see that each family is supplied with the Holy Scriptures report they have attended to ths appointment and find that each family is supplied,

 

SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS

Dover Monthly Meeting 2nd month, 1825

Daniel Bailey, Jonah Frazier, John Oren, Micajah C. Moorman, and Charles T. Moorman are appointed to attend to the subject of Spirituous Liquors as directed by the Yearly Meeting and report to this meeting in the 8th month.

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month 1825

The friends appointed in the 2nd month last in the case of Spirituous Liquors report they apprehend our Testimony in that case is rather gaining ground. The clerk is directed to forward a copy of this minute to the Quarterly Meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 9th month 1826

The committee appointed on the subject of Spirituous Liquors report they made some inspection in respect to the unnecessary use of that article and were of the opinion that our testimony is rather gaining ground. The clerk is directed to forward a copy of this minute to the Quarterly Meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month, 1931

The joint committee of men and women Friends have attended to the subject of our appointments on Spirituous Liquors and believe Friends are mostly clear of the unnecessary use of that article as far as appears. Signed on behalf of the committee by John Oren, John Frazier, and Mary Bailey which was satisfactory to the meeting. The clerk is directed to forward an extract of the above minute to the Quarterly Meeting.

RELIEF FOR INDIANS AND AFRICAN DESCENDANTS

Dover Monthly Meeting 4th month, 1827

Representatives to Quarterly Meetings inform this meeting that the Quarterly Meeting recommends that the monthly meeting open free subscriptions to procure clothing for the Indian children now at school at Friends Establishment near Wapaughkonneta (Wapokoneta) which this meeting takes notice of. A committee was appointed to attend to the subject and report to the next meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 5th month, 1827

Some of the Friends appointed to open free subscriptions have paid some attention to the subject. They are continued in that service and are to deliver what they get to Moses Frazier who is appointed to receive and report to next meeting

Dover Monthly Meeting 6th month. 1827

The Friends appointed to procure clothing for the Indians report they have got a few articles. They are directed to deliver then to Moses Frazier who is directed to forward them to the Acting Committee on Indian Concerns and report his care to next or a future meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month, 1827

The Friend appointed in 6th month to receive articles of clothing raised for Indian children reports he has complied with the object of his appointment.

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month, 1829

Agreeably to direction this meeting has opened free subscriptions to raise money to assist in promoting the school education of the African descendants and the natives of this land under Friends care at Wapakoneta and have raised the sum Of 31 1/4 cents for the African and the sum of $2.06 for the Indian concerns which is directed to be forwarded as directed by the Yearly Meeting. The clerk Is directed to forward an abstract of the above minute to the Quarterly Meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 8th month, 1830

The treasurer of this meeting is directed to pay over to Caleb Harvey., Treasurer of the Committee on Indian Concerns, the sum of $1.42 ½ cents raised by the preparative meetings to aid In the Indian Concern. The clerk is directed to forward an abstract of the above minute to the Quarterly Meeting,

Dover Monthly Meeting 12th month, 1838

The subject of a school in operation in Wilmington for the colored population under the care of the African Committee of Center Quarterly Meeting was introduced to the monthly meeting for the purpose of obtaining pecuniary aid for defraying expense of tuition.

Dover Monthly Meeting 11th month, 1840

The sum of $14.50 was subscribed in this meeting to aid the Center Branch of the African Committee for establishing a school for colored people in Wilmington for a term of three months.

 

EDUCATION

Dover Monthly Meeting 4th month, 1828

A copy of minute was received from the Quarterly Meeting expressive of a concern that the scriptures b« made more gen­eral use of as school books, also in families. Daniel Bailey, John Oren, David Bailey, John Pierson, and James Moorman are appointed to have the oversight of schools; also to endeavor to promote the more thorough reading of the scriptures in our families as well as our schools; also to take into consideration the direction of the Quarterly Meeting respecting procuring books of the writings of the writings of early Friends to be kept as books belonging to the monthly meeting and report fee next or future meetings.

Dover Monthly Meeting 6th month, 1830

The joint committee of men and women Friends appointed to propose some mode of procedure in regard to setting up schools under the control of the Monthly Meeting and in accordance with the discipline of our society made the following report: We have progressed so far in the settlement of Dover particular meeting as to procure a piece of land by donation adjoining the meeting house lot on the west side, and have purchased by free subscription part of the materials for building a frame school house thereon—188 16' x 20'; and expect the building will be commenced as soon as practicable. And in the settlement of Seneca, friends have a schoolhouse, but it does not appear practicable to put a school in operation at present.

In the settlement of Grassy Run it is contemplated to build a schoolhouse as soon as convenient.

Dover Monthly Meeting 7th month 1831

The following information was received from the Joint Committee appointed in the 12th month last on Education: To Dover Monthly Meeting to be held the 14th day of the 7th month 1831—

A part of the committee appointed by the Quarterly and Monthly Meetings on the subject of Education agree to report that in attention to the object of their appointment within tlie limits of Dover Monthly Meeting they have organized and established a school agreeable to the directions of Indiana Yearly Meeting of Friends, which school is now in operation near Dover Meeting House and we think it should claim the particular attention of said meeting. Signed on behalf of the committee - David Bailey and Mary Bailey. The meeting united with this report and a committee of 9 members was appointed to visit the school agreeably to the directions of the Quarterly Meeting.

Dover Monthly Meeting 7th month, .1833

The committee to whom was referred the subject of Education made the following report with which the meeting unites and directs the Clerk to forward an extract thereof to the Quarterly Meeting:

Report

We have endeavored to attend to the objects of our appointment and have to report that our school has been taught at Dover Meetinghouse six months of the present year, and is now vacated for want of a suitable teacher. The number of Friends children taught at said school was 24; the number in same settlement that did not attend is about 20. The other two settlements within our limits have been destitute of schools Seneca with 35 children and Grassyrun 17 who are not in the way of receiving education at such schools.

Signed by the committee David Bailey and Phoebe Haworth

Dover Monthly Meeting 3rd month, 1834

A number of books came to hand being a donation from Women Friends of London Yearly Meeting consisting of Library books and books for the use of schools. The Library books are referred to the directors of our library and the school books to the committee on Education.

Dover Monthly Meeting 7th month, 1834

Report of the Education Committee: We have endeavored to attend to the objects of our appointment and agree to report: 1st. - There is one school in opsration within the limits of the Monthly Meeting under the care of Friends. There are 40 children in this school. 2nd. - There are 2 neighborhoods in which schools have bean taught by persons in membership with us, but were not under the control of the Monthly Meeting. There are about 90 children in these schools. 3rd. - There are no children that are not in the way of receiving education.

Signed by the Committee Daniel Bailey and Dosha Moorman

Dover Monthly Meeting 2nd month, 1837

A minute was received from the Meeting for Sufferings on the subject of school donations from our friends in England sent to center Quarterly Meeting and an accompanying minute from the Quarterly Meeting on the apportionment of said donation among the Monthly Meetings.

"We the committee on the subject of the school donation from our friends in England unite in proposing that it be apportioned among the quarters by the following ratio, and that it be expended by the Quarterly and Monthly Meeting committees on the subject of Education in support of Friends Schools in such mariner as said committees may think most advisable and consistent with the wish of the donors—which we understand to be to assist Friends in the school education of their children by paying a part of the teacher's salary or compensation, having regard to the necessities of Friends; and the greater or lesser difficulties under which they of the different neighborhoods may be subjected."

The amount was apportioned among 11 Quarterly Meetings in Indiana Yearly Meeting of which Center Quarterly Meeting received 6% of the amount or $130.93. This amount was apportioned. among Center Quarterly Meeting as follows:

Centre Monthly Meeting

$46.64 1/3

Springfield " "

40.64 1/3

Dover " " °

43.64 1/3

Dover Monthly Meeting 9th month, 1840

This meeting is informed that a Deed of Conveyance has re­cently been made to the Trustees of this meeting for the lot on which our schoolhouse stands adjoining this Meeting House lot, the expense of which is $1.37 ½ which amount we direct our treasurer to pay said trustee.

 

DISOWNING MEMBERS

Dover Monthly Meeting 12th month, 1829

Dover Preparative Meeting complains of Joseph Oren for disorderly conduct in a meeting for discipline, also for neglecting to attend our religious meetings, and attending one meeting of Elias Hicks - which claiming the attention of this meeting, Charles T. Moorman, James Bryan, and John Pearson are appointed to treat with him on the occasion and report their sense of his situation of mind to next meeting.

1st month, 1830

The committee appointed to treat with Joseph Oren report they.have had an opportunity with him and believed him not fully qualified to make satisfaction. The same friends are continued, and James Moorman added to take another opportunity with him, and report to next meeting.

2nd month, 1830

The committee in Joseph Oren's case made the following report (to wit): We, the committee in Joseph Oren's case, attended thereto and had an opportunity with him and found him in a disposition of mind measurably disposed to make satisfaction; but the true conviction of heart not so manifest as desired; which we submit to this meeting. They also informed that the individual was left at liberty to produce an offering to the . meeting. He produced one which being read and considered, it was thought best not to accept it at this time. The case was continued under the care of the same committee to extend further labor with him and report to next meeting.

3rd month, 1830

The committee in Joseph Oren's case report the service not attended to. They are continued to report to next meeting.

4th month, 1830

The committee in Joseph Oren's case made the following report (to wit): We the committee of Joseph Oren's case have attended to the appointment and had an opportunity with him and believe he is not in a situation of mind to make satisfaction, which report was united with by the meeting and Jonah Frazier and Moses Frazier are appointed to prepare a testification against him, inform him thereof, and produce it at the next meeting.

5th month, 1830

The friends appointed to prepare a testification against Joseph Oxen produced one which after some alteration was approved and signed as follows: Joseph Oren having a right of membership amongst friends, but hath so far deviated from the good order used amongst us as to be guilty of a neglect of the attendance of our religious meetings, and of disorderly conduct in a meeting for discipline, and attending a meeting of the followers of Elias Hicks, and having been labored with without the desired effect, we therefore disown him from being a member of our society.

Signed in and on behalf of Dover Monthly Meeting of Friends held the 13th of 5th month 1830. Thomas P. Moorman, clerk

We appoint Daniel Bailey and John Peebles to offer him a copy of the foregoing testification, notifying him of his privilege of appeal, and report to the next meeting.

6th month, 1830

The friends appointed to offer Joseph Oren a copy of his testification and notify him of his right of appeal, report it is complied with.

II. Moorman Johnson, Sr.

Dover Monthly Meeting 3rd month, 1830

One of the Friends appointed to prepare a testification against Moorman Johnson, Sr. reports he attended the appointment in company with another friend and gave the following testification against him (to wit.) ; "Moorman Johnson, Sr. being a member of the Religious Society of Friends, has so far deviated from the good order used among us as to buy and sell whiskey, he having been treated with without the desired effect, we therefore disown him." Thomas P. Moorman, clerk

III. Lydia Oren, Sr.

Dover Monthly Meeting 9th month, 1829

Women Friends produced the following acknowledgements made by Lydia Oren, Sr

.To Dover Monthly Meeting

Dear Friends, I have made use of expressing inadvertly that did in some degree go to strengthen the Anti-Christian doctrine of Ellas Hicks, for which I am truly sorry and hope Friends will pass by this my offense and continue me under their care.
Lydia Oren, Sr.

which claiming the attention of the meeting is accepted and the further care referred to women friends.

IV. ,John F. Shields

Dover Monthly Meeting 2nd month, 1835

Testification: Whereas John F. yields having a right of membership in the Religious Society of Friends but by not duly regarding the good order thereof, has deviated so far as to accomplish his marriage contrary to discipline, for which he has been labored with in love, but not manifesting any disposition of mind to make satisfaction, the meeting therefore disowns him from being a member.

V. Moses Starbuck

Dover Monthly Meeting 5th month, 1837

Dover Preparative Meeting complains of Moses Starbuck for being at a frolic and trying to dance, also for making use of profane language. He produced an offering condeming the same which is accepted. (William Shields and Jonah Frazier are appointed to inform him thereof and report to next meeting.)

VI. James Frazier

Dover Monthly Meeting 11th month. 1837

The committee appointed to treat with James Frazier they have attended to the appointment and had an opportunity with him, and thought him in a good degree suitably disposedto make satisfaction, with which this meeting unites and the individual produced an acknowlegement as follows which this meeting receives and continues him under its care and appointsJonah Frazier and David Bailey to inform him the result, and report to next meeting.

Acknowledgement: "1 have so far deviated from the good order of Friends as to make use of profane language and kick a fellow creature and unadvisedly prosecute a member of our society at law - for all of which misconduct I am sorry, and hope Friends will forgive my transgression and continue me under their care."

Some Statistics from the first 80 years of Dover Monthly Meeting

During this period of time, Grassy Run and Jamestown (Senecca) Meetings were established and as preparative meetings were component parts of Dover Monthly Meeting.

From l824-l834, 16 members were received and 42 disowned.

From 1834-1844, 16 members were received and 45 disowned

From 1844-1854, 15 members were received and 44 disowned.

From 1854-1864, 70 members were received and 34 disowned.
This was the start of the revival era.

From 1364-1374, 293 members were received and 9 disowned.

From 1874-1884, 267 members were received and 115 disowned

From 1884-1894, 155 members were received and 65 disowned.

In these eight years, 15 ministers were recorded, including one woman, Irena Hunnicutt. Also included In this number was John Henry Douglass.

The following was written about his ministry.

"John Henry Douglass, who was recorded in 1858 was in his prime, probably the most distinguished and powerful Quaker preacher in the world. In the early part of the revival era, his brother Robert wrote to him to come and help him at Wilmington, saying "I have been preaching to them as best I can, but I want thee to come and set them on Fire." And he generally did. I remember hearing a Hoosier say "When John Henry Douglass comes to our meetings he fairly stirs up the "Natives" and makeo the dry bones rattle.

 

WILMINGTON MEETING REQUESTS TO BE AN INDULGED MEETING

Dover Monthly Meeting 7th month, 1841

The Joint Committee appointed by Center and Dover Monthly Meetings on the request of Friends composing the indulged meeting at Wilmington for the privilege of an established meeting for divine worship on first and fifth days of the week except the fifth day in preparative and Monthly Meeting weeks, report as follows:

"We the committee on the request of Friends of Wilmington have mostly attended there to, had an opportunity with them in a collective capacity, and on conferring together are free that their request be granted which will be submitted to the Monthly

Meetings."

Signed on behalf of the Committee Thomas Arnett, Daniel Bailey, Naomi Painter, Elizabeth Hunnicutt

The committee appointed report "The Joint Committee of Center and Dover Monthly Meetings having the care of the indulged meeting of Wilmington unite in reporting that it has been kept up to satisfaction and are free that it be continued.